Andy Catlin

Andy Catlin

Audio Consultant

Detroit, MI

248.591.9276 x248

Email Andy

When you ask Andy Catlin about music, there is one word he uses over and over again: "Obsession."

"I have an obsessive appetite to create," the Michigan native exclaims. "The sheer hours I spend in the studio doing what I love is what this is all about."

It all began while listening to his parent's record collection, a path that would eventually lead him to take up keyboard and clarinet. Yet, the real game changer came for Andy in the eighth grade.

"My parents gifted me a Tascam cassette four-track for Christmas and I never looked back," Andy says. "I came home from school and went straight to the four-track. I woke up early on weekends to record. I tracked every band that would let me."

Andy's love of experimentation and demoing with the four-track is something that still seeps into the audio projects he works on today. Influenced by the work Madlib, R Stevie Moore, Knxwledge and Ariel Pink, Andy is apt to start with the sound of a synth running through pedals, acoustic guitar noodling or chopping up samples and let it influence where the composition goes.

"Experimenting and making demos is the most inspiring part of the recording process because it's where you can really surprise yourself," Andy states. "I love every element of production from tracking to mixing to mastering, but I find that demoing with an open mind, free from the pressure of ‘getting the take' is what inspires me most."

When he's not spending time with his wife and family or working on his own audio creations, Andy is working at Vintage King as one of our latest Audio Consultant hires. If you want to push your sound to the next level, he can help get you to where you want to go.

"I love helping musicians get the tools they need to realize their sound. There's a particular excitement and anticipation that comes with new gear and it's fun to be a part of that."

Q & A

What is your favorite piece of gear?
It's always changing. Last year it was Chase Bliss pedals and before that, it was the Korg MS-20. Tascam tape machines, Roland samplers, and Ableton Live seem to be the pieces that never go away for me.

What piece of gear changed how people work the most?
Ableton Live. Democratized digital music production and invited listeners to become creators with a tool set that acknowledged the needs of techno, hip-hop, & house music producers.

What is the most important piece of recording or production advice you've ever received?
Throw it at a wall and see what sticks.