Reverb

  1. How Does The New AMS RMX16 500 Series Compare To A Vintage RMX16 And Plug-In Emulation?

    How Does The New AMS RMX16 500 Series Compare To A Vintage RMX16 And Plug-In Emulation?
    By now you've heard the fantastic news that AMS Neve has revived the beloved RMX16 for the 500 Series rack. The new module was the talk of the NAMM Show in January and had pro audio lovers speculating just how close AMS Neve would get to the original unit. Newsflash! They don't disappoint. The 500 Series version of the RMX16 follows suit with the classic nine reverb programs (plus nine rare aftermarket programs) and allows users to control all parameters in three distinct ways. Dialing in the perfect reverb for your source is possible by way of the pot control section (a rotary dial), the nudge section (Down/Up buttons), and Alphanumeric keypad entry. How does it sound though? Continue reading →
  2. AMS Revives Classic RMX16 Reverb For 500 Series Racks

    AMS Revives Classic RMX16 Reverb For 500 Series Racks
    When talking about classic pieces of gear heard on hit records, the AMS RMX16 has easily earned its spot at the table. The reverb microprocessor became a must-use piece of gear in the 1980s and has gone on to become one of the most revered reverberation units ever. Just ahead of the 2020 NAMM Show, AMS has announced that they’re giving the classic unit the 500 series treatment with a new version of the RMX16. While the original units were coveted and sonically magical, they also carried a massive price tag and thus were fairly rare and unattainable. With this new offering in 500 series form from AMS, a new generation of engineers will be able to use this reverb classic in their 500 Series rack for much less. The RMX16 500 series module is set to carry a price tag of just $1295, making its cost almost as small as its new, compact footprint. Continue reading →
  3. Reverb Visits Vintage King Tech Shop To Talk World-Class Gear

    Reverb Visits Vintage King Tech Shop To Talk World-Class Gear
    Earlier today, our friends over at Reverb shared a video that highlights Vintage King Audio via a trip through the Vintage King Tech Shop. Vintage King Audio co-founder Mike Nehra acts as your tour guide telling stories from the company's past and showing off some prized vintage gear currently in the shop. If you haven't had a chance to check out Reverb's video, you can watch it below. Afterward, continue reading to learn more about the gear featured in the video, including classic pieces from Neumann, Neve, Telefunken/TAB, Universal Audio, and API Audio. Continue reading →
  4. Replicating Plate Reverb With Plug-Ins, Pedals And Outboard Gear

    Replicating Plate Reverb With Plug-Ins, Pedals And Outboard Gear
    A few weeks back, we posted a new VK Shootout featuring a vintage EMT 140 plate reverb going up against some popular emulations. People were digging the shootout so much that we decided to do another blog that expands on other ways to get plate reverb sounds in the studio and during live performances. Since the release of the original EMT 140, the options for getting plate reverb sounds have gotten way smaller. Sure... Being smaller than a 600-pound metal structure isn't super hard, but we're talking much smaller, like nearly as small as the palm of your hand. Continue reading →
  5. VK Shootout: Vintage EMT 140 Plate Reverb vs. Reverb Plug-Ins

    VK Shootout: Vintage EMT 140 Plate Reverb vs. Reverb Plug-Ins
    In the early years of the recording studio, engineers had to rely on microphone placement and echo chambers to get the reverb that they desired for certain tracks. This all would change when the German company EMT built the first artificial reverb unit in 1957.  Dubbed the EMT 140, this plate reverb would go onto become one of the most revered and often copied sounds in audio history. What exactly is the EMT 140 Plate Reverb? While the unit itself is pretty massive, the concept of how it works is pretty simple. A steel frame holds a large thin piece of sheet metal via springs attached to each corner of the outer structure. At the center of the piece of sheet metal,  there is a transducer, which gets a signal from the studio's control room. The transducer vibrates the sheet metal and two pickups mounted to the plate pick up the resulting vibrations. The EMT 140 also features a dampener that allows you to dial in decay time. Continue reading →

5 Item(s)

I would like to thank VK for the wonderful sales assistance, service and prices. This was my first purchase with you and it won't be my last. I only wish I'd discovered you years ago!
Matthew R.
I had two Grammy wins this year - Ray LaMontagne & Carolina Chocolate Drops. Both made with help from Vintage King!
Ryan F.
In almost 20 years in Pro audio buying, never did I receive a unit so well packed and exactly as described. Works flawlessly. The whole process has been so smooth. I will never hesitate to do business with you guys in the future and will recommend you to everyone I know.
Martin C.
This was my first experience buying something from Vintage King (although I surf the "used" categories on the website frequently!), and, despite being on the other side of the world, I had absolutely no trouble and everything went very smoothly.
Phil T.